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2013 USPS Muscle Cars Stamps – America On The Move

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muscle cars

We opened our Contract Postal Unit (CPU) officially on July 1, 2013 and have been having fun discovering the richness of USPS stamps. Each set represents an amazing level of research and commitment to bringing aspects of American life and history to the forefront of our minds. Plus, the artwork on each has truly impressed us.

The 2013 USPS Muscle Cars Stamps were released in February 2013, well before we opened. We’ve recently discovered them while searching for the newest and most stunning stamps. So, it’s only appropriate to share all the USPS offers in terms of research on this vibrant set of stamps. All further info on this post has been taken from the USPS site at http://www.usps.com.

“Freedom, Adventure, and Burning Rubber

Fast, powerful, and eye-catching, muscle cars roared their way onto America’s roads in the 1960s. Typically equipped with big, powerful engines, these high-performance vehicles represented the era’s adventurous spirit. Muscle Cars is the third issuance in the America on the Move series.

The Muscle Cars stamps are being issued as Forever® stamps in self-adhesive sheets of 20 (4 of each design). Forever stamps are always equal in value to the current First-Class Mail® one-ounce price.

First day of issue: February 22, 2013 | Daytona, FL Dodge Charger Daytona and Plymouth Hemi ‘Cuda are trademarks of Chrysler Group LLC”

And now for a description of each of the featured five muscle cars….

“1966 Pontiac GTO
A New Era of 0-60

The Pontiac GTO ushered in the American muscle-car era in the mid-1960s. The first GTO was built to house the engine of a full-size sedan in the intermediate-size Tempest LeMans. The GTO (Gran Turismo Omologato, Italian for Grand Touring Homologated) could really move: in tests, it went from 0 to 60 miles per hour in 6.8 seconds. The distinctive car featured curvy body styling and a split grille, and was available as a hardtop, coupe, or convertible. General Motors Chevelle and Pontiac Trademarks used under license to the USPS.

1967 Shelby GT-500
Spoiler, Stripes, and a Smooth Ride

Manufacturer Carroll Shelby’s take on the Ford Mustang reflected his roots as a racecar driver. Powered by a Police Interceptor engine, the 1967 Shelby GT-500 also featured a rear spoiler and rocker panel stripes. Its grille-mounted headlights, scooped fiberglass hood, extended nose, and interior roll bar and shoulder harnesses further enhanced the racecar feel. And the 1967 Shelby GT-500’s improved suspension softened the ride for highway and racetrack alike. The car was both striking and rare; only 2,048 were built. “Shelby®” and “GT-500®” are registered trademarks of Carroll Shelby Licensing, Inc. used under license. MUSTANG is a registered trademark of Ford Motor Company.

1969 Dodge Charger Daytona
An Aerodynamic Head-Turner

The 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona was designed to dominate the racetrack, and it took the checkered flag at its NASCAR debut in September 1969 at the Alabama International Motor Speedway in Talladega. The Daytona was an aerodynamic head-turner: its concealed headlights, fender-mounted scoops, a rear-mounted wing nearly two feet tall, and 18-inch nosepiece helped it cut sleekly through the air. It also sported thick body stripes containing the word “DAYTONA.” These distinctive vehicles were hard to come by: only 503 were produced. Dodge Charger Daytona and Plymouth Hemi ‘Cuda are trademarks of Chrysler Group LLC

1970 Plymouth Hemi ‘Cuda
Bold Design. Fierce Attitude.

The 1970 Plymouth Hemi ‘Cuda, a performance-oriented alter-ego of the standard Plymouth Barracuda, oozed power. Its Shaker hood scoop vibrated as air flowed through to its beast-like engine. The ‘Cuda’s styling was an extension of its bold ethos: it came in a variety of vibrant, eye-popping colors.

With hockey-stick shaped stripes denoting engine size, a shifter handle shaped like a pistol grip, and bucket seats, the ‘Cuda was unflinchingly fearless. The model is also a rare specimen: fewer than 700 were produced.
Dodge Charger Daytona and Plymouth Hemi ‘Cuda are trademarks of Chrysler Group LLC

1970 Chevelle SS
Serious Style.Seriously Powerful.

With features like optional twin racing stripes, the 1970 Chevelle SS looked fierce. SS, which stood for Super Sport, was a fitting designation for this seriously powerful vehicle: its LS-6 engine is legendary among car buffs for its sheer might. The Chevelle SS was lightning-fast, finishing in the 13-second range in quarter-mile tests. The car offered more than impressive road performance: known for its unique style, it featured a black grille and SS emblems on both the grille and the rear bumper.General Motors Chevelle and Pontiac Trademarks used under license to the USPS.”

Hats off to the artwork and design on the muscle car stamps. “The Muscle Cars stamp issuance celebrates the high-performance vehicles that captured our imagination when they first roared onto our roads in the 1960s. Art director Carl T. Herrman designed the stamps, created by artist Tom Fritz, who based his artwork on photographs of the cars, using bright-colored oil paints on hardboard to try to “capture the emotive quality” of each one.”

Each sheet of 20 forever stamps sells for $9.20 and includes a full description of each car on the backside. Thanks, USPS, for keeping these powerful cars and the era they ushered in, alive in our memories.

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About taf

Owner of Gifts To Go/Contract Postal Unit located in Surprise, AZ

4 responses »

  1. I have been trying to buya set of these stamps but they won’t post them to the UK. 😦

    Reply
  2. Pingback: How God Charged me up, In The Rain | Dawning on Me Daily...

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